Monday, June 29, 2020

Introducing Between Ink and Shadows



She'll win back her freedom, even if she has to steal it.

Nimona Weston has a debt to pay. Her father’s dealings with the dark society known as the Trust cost Nim her freedom. There’s one way out of the contract on her life and that’s to bide her time and pay the tithes. But when the Trust assigns Nim to a task in the king’s own castle, her freedom is not the only thing she’ll risk.

Warrick Spenser has a secret. As king’s seneschal, he should be the last soul in Inara to risk association with dark magic, but long-hidden ties to the Trust are harder to shed than simply cutting the threads. When the Trust sends a thief to his rooms, Warrick thinks he’s finally found a way to be rid of them for good. But Nimona Weston is hiding secrets of her own.


Magical contracts, blood-debt accountants, and a deadly game. A dark and twisty fantasy that pits magic against kings, perfect for fans of Sorcery of Thorns and Serpent & Dove.

Pre-Order now at Amazon, Apple Books, and Kobo





Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Seven Ways to Kill a King Cover Reveal



I'm thrilled to share the cover for Seven Ways to Kill a King, coming September 1, 2020. Illustration by the amazing Luisa Preissler with typography by Silver Wing Press.




 She was born a princess. They made her an assassin.


One was an accident. Two a coincidence. By three, they would know. It would be harder, but I would avenge my mother’s death. These kings would pay that price.

Seven cities make up the Storm Queen’s Realm, each of their self-crowned, murderous kings are one of Princess Myrina’s marks. The treasonous curs may have banded together to share a stolen throne, but soon they will fall.

They thought her dead, killed in the massacre. They thought their rule secure, but Myrina of Stormskeep has awoken. With the help of her loyal bloodsworn, the shadow princess will have her revenge.

For fans of The Witcher and Game of Thrones—a new princess set on vengeance is here to steal your heart.



Pre-order now at Amazon,  Apple Books  Barnes & NobleGoogle Play, and Kobo




Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Feather and Bone Release Day

It's release day for The Frey Saga series finale--Book VI: Feather and Bone 


A bargain with a fey lord cannot be unbroken.

Frey holds the fate of both the fey and elven lands in her half-blood hands. The encroaching darkness has crept past the boundary and claimed a life as its toll. If she doesn’t discover a way to end it, the next casualty could be one of her own.


As her Seven rush to discover the source of the darkness, the changelings conspire to break themselves free, bringing forth a new danger--one that could end them all.


Time is running out, and her only chance to defeat the darkness might be to embrace it.



Available now at AmazonApple BooksBarnes & NobleGoogle PlayKobo, and Smashwords.





Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Shadow and Stone Release Day Giveaway

Check out The Frey Saga Book V: Shadow and Stone Release Day celebration for a tour-exclusive sale, character art, and a chance to win an Amazon gift card!


On Tour with Prism Book Tours

***SPECIAL SALE***


Go to Smashwords HERE and enter QU46N at checkout to grab the first three books for only 99¢!

Shadow and Stone
(Frey Saga #5)
By Melissa Wright
New Adult, YA Fantasy
Paperback & ebook
February 4th 2020

No bargains unpaid.

After a perilous clash with the fey, the changeling who betrayed the paramount of their laws--and threatens the safety of both realms--has gone into hiding. As Frey and her Seven recover, concealed plans and furtive bargains begin to unravel, putting in danger their old guard and new.

They’re on unsteady ground.

Scattered and healing, those sworn to protect the North and its lord work to secure their footing. They are running out of time to cure the darkness poisoning the fey lands, before it overflows into the rest of the realm. But Ruby has gone missing, and this time it seems of her own accord.

They’re out of time.

If they don’t stop her, she’ll face the deadly changeling alone. But more forces are at play than it seems, and the fey lord confined on his lands by treachery and two half-human elves has made a bargain of his own.

(Affiliate link included.)

Guest Post: What You Need to Know About the Frey Saga

New to The Frey Saga? Check out what you need to know to jump into this world of magic, elves, and fey. (Warning: this post containers spoilers for the first three books.)

Types of magic

Magical energies are divided into light, dark, and that of the fey. These energies to do not play well together (and neither do their owners).

What makes Frey special?

Freya, Lord of the North and the Dark Elves’ Kingdom, is a halfbreed. She’s not only able to use the magic of both the light and dark energies, but she’s also half human--a weakness as far as any of the North are concerned. She’s managed to keep her throne despite that though, in no small part due to her rare ability to control animals. She’s been known to use birds of prey, wolves, and mountain cats, and readers can expect a few larger beasts as her talent grows.

Who’s the villain?

It depends on who you ask. Light elves oppose the methods of the dark and dark elves the light, but both hate the fey. The fey court is headed by the fey lord Veil, whose power is strong enough to shift the seasons. Veil—like all fey—engages in dangerous games and relies heavily on deceit and trickery.

Cast of characters
Frey’s high guard is known as the Seven, a once ragtag band of elves turned warriors including a halfblood fey, her horse trader brother, the strongarm, the wizards, the quick one, and the brooding hero/love interest: Chevelle.

The story so far

After meddling with powers and making deals with the fey, Frey’s predecessor was removed as Lord of the North. A great many lives were lost in the battles that followed, including Frey’s mother, and as heir to the throne Frey has much work ahead of her to set things to right. She’s finally settled into her place as ruler and her Seven and guard are loyal and true, but a darkness was set free during that meddling that threatens not only her people, but all elves and fey.

What’s next

In The Frey Saga Book V: Shadow and Stone, Frey faces her biggest challenge yet. A deadening of magic is spreading through the kingdoms and one of her Seven has gone missing. As fey treacheries and past secrets unravel, Frey’s duty as Lord might force her into a bargain that could destroy them all.

Other Books in the Series


About the Author

Melissa is the author of the Frey Saga, Descendants Series, and Shattered Realms. She is currently working on the next book, but when not writing can be spotted collecting the things she loves at Goodreads and Pinterest. Contact her through the web at www.melissa-wright.com.


Bookstagram Tour


Follow the tour here! Get extra entries in the giveaway
below when you follow and comment on each stop!

February 4th: @jhannabass
February 5th: @mythical_books
February 6th: @acmeteenbooks2019
February 7th: @canadianbookaddict
February 8th: @leslielmckee

Tour Giveaway


One winner will receive an ebook box set of the first three books in the series (Frey, Pieces of Eight, and Rise of Seven) and a $20 Amazon eGift Card
Open internationally (as long as winner is eligible to receive prizes)
Ends February 10, 2020

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Friday, January 3, 2020

Sneak Peek: Shadow and Stone


Sneak Peek Time! Check out this first chapter sample of The Frey Saga Book V (and a new series character!) and Pre-order Shadow and Stone now...


THE FREY SAGA BOOK V:
SHADOW AND STONE

By Melissa Wright
copyright 2020





CHAPTER ONE
Thea

Thea had been a sentry for exactly one day when she was thrown into the biggest conflict the North had seen in centuries. The dark elves had nearly gone to war with the fey, and Junnie, the new Council head, rode side by side with Thea and her childhood friend Steed, who had become one of Seven to the Lord of the North, as light and dark elves joined forces to overcome traps laid by the fey. Thea had stood upon the stones of the high fey court with her blade in hand and her life on the line. She’d been terrified but had felt no less than a warrior. Thea had found her calling.
She’d not seen a lick of action since.
She dropped the bucket of muck she’d been carrying with a muttered curse, glaring up the pathway to her superior’s leather-clad back. He wasn’t even the head of the guard. He was a subordinate to a subordinate of the head of the guard, and he’d been riding her like a stolen mare.
Thea ran the back of her hand across her forehead, unsurprised when it came away wet, not with sweat so much but with plenty of the black gunk they’d had her scraping off the base of the stable block. She didn’t even rate high enough to tend the animals.
It wasn’t as if she’d had lofty expectations. Before she’d left home, she’d heard all the criticisms: “You’re too skinny. You’re too young. You can’t even wield a proper sword.” They weren’t all wrong. It was true she was thin, but she could hold her own. She wasn’t much, but what there was of her was strong. And she was young, at least compared to those who’d warned her, but she was nearly as old as Steed, Grey, and the rest of the guard.
The sword wielding, though, she couldn’t really defend. She glanced at her dirt-smeared hands, which were long and lean but scarred by the mistakes she’d made for the whole of her life.
Thea had worked with the animals in Camber, an occupation she’d loved. She’d been a healer, too, first for the animals, then the townspeople, and eventually for the occasional rogue. Word had gotten out, and she’d garnered a host of rogues, fighters, and ruffians as patients.
Her father had not approved. Thea had a bad habit of sticking herself in situations that didn’t come out clean. It wasn’t that she was clumsy, but she tended to go in headfirst—and in most unpleasant circumstances, feetfirst was the only good way. Her father used to tell her that it didn’t hurt to turn tail and run once in a while.
She hadn’t run, though. No matter how terrified Thea might be, she was always more afraid of running and of being called a coward than she was of fighting.
It was foolish, really, and immature, but there was no question that it had gotten her to where she was. And she had stood among legends, fighting beside the high guard to the Lord of the North. Well, she hadn’t done much fighting, but she’d stood with them.
She swiped her hands on the sides of her pants. “Done,” she called up the pathway toward her superior’s back.
He didn’t acknowledge her. He was fool-headed and arrogant above his station, but Thea didn’t tell him so. Instead, she trudged up the dark stone pathway to address him as he expected to be addressed. “Done,” she said, “sir.”
He glanced at her sidelong then back at the haze of a hidden horizon.
She waited. “Shall I—”
His glare cut her short.
She bit back her next retort.
“The blocks aren’t clean,” he said. “Start again.”
Thea’s mouth tightened for one long moment before she opened it again without regard for her better judgment. She was jerked to the side by a sudden pull on her arm, her curse heading for the source of the tug instead of her superior, but she drew up short. A stout black-haired boy in full leathers stared down at her.
“Thea,” he said. “I’ve just finished my shift. Let me give you a hand.”
He nodded at the guard, drawing Thea away from the man and back down the path. Thea had seen the boy before and had known him in Camber. Well, known was maybe a strong word. But she’d heard about him. Those dark eyes held a story as unhappy as any she’d ever been told. His name was Barris, and he was from a well-loved family—Thea’s father and the entire town had thought highly of his parents.
They were gone now. His father, Burne, and his mother, Camren, had been killed in a single season when the new lord had fought for her throne. Thea wondered what made people give their lives for a person. For a cause, she could understand—for the North. But to lose so many for a single life…
Dreamer. Her father’s word slammed into her, the way they often did when Thea lost sight of the present. She’d joined the cause, and she was present, even if it did mean sacrificing many to protect one. She would be cursed if they thought they could keep her from her aim.
Thea wrenched her arm free, picked up her steps, and leaned in so her narrowed gaze could target Barris’s. “I don’t need your help, you know.”
Barris smirked. “Clearly. You were getting along well. Seemed like you were about to turn over a new leaf with your superior.”
She rolled her eyes. “With the wall. I don’t need your help with the wall.” She kept her hands from flying, matron-style, to her hips. “You don’t have to do my work for me.”
“Oh, I’m not,” he answered. “I just wanted to stop you from provoking our lead and getting our entire group thrown in a hole.”
Thea stopped, making Barris glance over his shoulder to see her. “They don’t do that,” she said.
Her words were too timid, and she regretted them at once. Of course they didn’t lock recruits in the ground as punishment—they wouldn’t. Besides, the castle tunnels were just a legend. She’d not seen a single one.
Barris laughed. “No, they do not.” He turned, crossing his arms over his broad chest. “But they do make you scrape muck off the stalls.”
Her expression soured. “You’re saying this is my fault? That idiotic, arrogant—”
Barris shook his head. “No, I’m sure you got sludge duty entirely without insulting your superior.” He tossed her an empty bucket and looked at the pile of filthy rags, chisels, and short-handled spades. “Why are you doing this by hand?”
“Because it’s virtuous,” she spat. “Hard work is good for the spirit.”
Barris stared at her. It was possible he was regretting stepping in to save her when she was clearly a loon.
She let her shoulders fall, defeated, then gestured with a tip of her head back up the path. “He made me.”
Barris chuckled. “I see.” He brushed his palms together, glancing surreptitiously to and fro. They were mostly alone there, out of sight of the other castle staff. “How about you keep watch, and I give you a hand. By the time he realizes you had help, we’ll be enjoying mess.”
Thea chewed her lip. She was hungry. And her superior was a big-headed idiot. “Whatever keeps you out of trouble,” she said.


Thea didn’t regret letting Barris help. He’d worked quickly, and they were soon belly-up to the table, partaking in roast pig and crisp apples with the other castle guards. It wasn’t her first time at mess, but she’d rarely made it on schedule, thanks to the extra tasks assigned to her by their lead.
The table was long with several benches, all filled with loud and chattering sentries and recruits, on either side. It might not have been her first time there, but it was the first time she’d not been exhausted and exasperated. It was the first time she’d actually enjoyed it. A few of the off-duty sentries laughed and told tales as dark-red wine sloshed in their mugs. The younger few, all new recruits, watched, laughing along but not joining in the drink, having quickly learned the rules were different for the seasoned men. Occasionally, Edan passed through the proceedings, but the head of the castle guard usually kept his distance during their off hours. It kept him from growing too close, inadvertently becoming a friend instead of the incontestable, or so the others had said. Edan was head of command, and his word was law. Only a high guard, one of Lord Freya’s Seven, could overrule him.
Steed was one of the Seven. Thea plucked an apple stem from its core, annoyed that her thoughts had returned to Steed. It wasn’t the first time she’d thought of him since she’d been stuck scrubbing palace walls. She knew it wasn’t his responsibility to stick up for her or to point out to the other guards that she’d stood with them on fey lands. She didn’t need him to win her a place among the guard. Besides, he might have thought she deserved her fate. Cleaning muck might be part of the process, an initiation.
She dropped two apples into her pocket as her eyes ran down the table to several dozen other guards. They’d not been cleaning stalls.
“Right.” She tossed another apple into the air and caught it in a cupped palm before standing.
“Heading off?” Barris asked. He’d been leaning close to another guard, deep in conversation, but the seriousness seemed to melt from his face when he straightened to talk to her. Maybe she’d been imagining it. Maybe she’d been reflecting some invented torment of her own onto his face at the idea of losing either parent, let alone both.
“Yes,” she told him. “Thanks for earlier.”
Barris rolled his palm upward and gave her a smile that appeared entirely natural, not broken by grief or irrevocably scarred. “All in service to the guard.” His brow shifted the slightest bit, his eyes sharing in his smile. “Stay out of trouble, aye?”
“Wouldn’t think of it.” She winked, tossing and catching the apple once more before she turned to go.
She was no longer hungry, not quite tired, and a day’s ride from the haunts of her old home. Thea walked through the castle courtyards, still unfamiliar with the layout of the grounds. Edan had shown them the important paths, the battlements and balustrades and armories that pertained to their duties as guards. But Thea had yet to memorize the insignificant bits—nooks and crannies where one might be able to sit and hide, the smaller courtyards with leafy trees and garden shelves, and the overhangs that could keep one out of the rain. Thea loved a good hideaway, somewhere to stand outside of the bustle to watch the goings-on.
The castle had a lot of dark corners and more than its fair share of mysterious passages. She’d rarely been indoors for her duties those last weeks but would not have been surprised if the newly appointed castle staff got lost more than they found their way. It didn’t help that Thea had practically lived out-of-doors before. When her parents had forced her inside, it had been into a four-room cabin, where she and her sister shared a single room. Cora had been the opposite of Thea in nearly every possible way. Growing up, Thea climbed trees and learned to shoot with a bow, while Cora sat indoors, sewing and singing and mixing perfumes for her hair.
“Wouldn’t hurt you to wear a little perfume,” she would tease Thea, her nose scrunched at some imagined outdoorsy smell.
Thea could always be counted on to return the favor, though, bringing in a speared fish or dumping a satchel of earth-covered mandrake root onto her sister’s freshly prepared table. “Wouldn’t hurt you to find a little food,” she would say, parroting her sister’s tone.
They’d grown up eventually, to their mother’s great relief, and Cora’s hobbies had paid off. She had developed a talent—her embroidery and needlework were among the best in the land. Certainly, they’d surpassed anything in Camber. Cora had moved out of their small cabin last season, finally attaching herself to a trader their father had thought merely sold her wares. Thea’s father had often been blind to the difference between Cora’s business relations and those relations who were not, despite Cora’s plunging necklines and red-painted lips. She’d been sly with more than just needlework, come to think of it, and had let Thea bear the brunt of her father’s disapproval.
Cora had once had an eye for Steed when they were younger. She’d worked her magic with her soft, scented hair and blossom-pink cheeks. She’d even tied feathers and baubles into the two braided strands that crowned her dark curls. The attempt hadn’t succeeded in the least. Back then, Steed had other things on his mind, such as the responsibilities his father had left behind, the horse trade, and a half-fey sister. Thea was surprised the boy had managed at all. But he’d had Grey. And he’d had that half-fey sister.
Given everything he’d been through, Steed had managed quite well.
Thea tossed her apple skyward as she ambled through an open stone archway. Maybe all the guards had some tragic history. It probably wasn’t as bad as Barris’s or Steed’s, but the massacre had affected most of the families in the North in some way. Thea’s family had been fortunate. Her father had kept them from getting involved.
She took a narrow stone corridor from one courtyard to the next and found herself once again on familiar ground. Low walls surrounded a large square of grass, the enclosure one of two where the horses could roam. Steed’s stock there was limited, she’d heard. It had been discussed in town so many seasons ago, back when he joined the high guard. He couldn’t bring them all in, so a few of the men from Camber had been put in charge of managing the remainder of the herds. The horses kept in the castle courtyards were lovely, the best of the best. She watched them graze, their coats slick and dark over thickly muscled frames.
Foot traffic had been walled off, and the atmosphere was quiet and peaceful and cool. The evening sun was fading, and a lone bird drifted across the darkening sky. Thea leapt onto the fence, hooking the heel of her boot over the stone to pull herself up. She landed in the grass on the other side, and a young gelding raised his head. Thea cooed, showing him the apple she held.
“There’s a good boy,” she told him, watching as he strode her way. “Someone’s taught you about treats.” She smiled when he nudged her with his head. She gave him a bite of apple, brushing her fingers over his neck. It was what she’d imagined when she’d come to serve as a guard. Thea had thought, foolish dreamer that her father had always said she was, that she could work in the stables, spending all day brushing and feeding horses.
It was ridiculous, her parents had said. And of course she’d known there would be battles, and of course, she’d realized she’d have to defend the castle on occasion. “Surely,” she’d told them, “you don’t believe they will stick a sword in my hand and throw me to the wolves.”
Gooseflesh rose on Thea’s arms at the word and the not-so-distant memory of the new light elves’ Council head and her wolves. At first, Junnie had only moved the one of them, bringing it to the forest’s edge to meet Thea and Steed. That had been disconcerting enough. But when they approached the fey lands, Thea had seen the truth of it and the power behind the light elf who had broken the old Council.
Freya had the same power, Thea understood, the ability to walk in the mind of a beast.
And in humans.
She shook off a chill, running a hand over the gelding’s back. She walked forward, crossing the grass court, and pulled a second apple from her pocket. “Here’s a pretty boy,” she murmured, drawing another horse from his crop. The second horse bit into the apple, splitting it at the core with a snap that echoed through the courtyard. The sky had darkened further, but Thea sensed a shadow too dim to see. She glanced up as the bird circled lower and spread its massive wings. It was a hawk. The gelding nudged Thea, searching for the apple’s other half. She laughed, gave it over, and rubbed between his ears.
“The stable yards are off limits,” said a voice behind her.
She jumped, bumping the pair of horses on their heads as she turned. One of the geldings nickered.
“Steed.”
He was too close. She’d not even heard him. Her heart hammered in her chest, and then she remembered he was her superior. She was on forbidden ground.
“I’m sorry,” she told him. “I—” But she didn’t have an excuse. She’d known where she was and wasn’t allowed to go. Her shoulders fell. “What’s my punishment?”
A gelding bumped her, knocking her arm out of the way to search for the last apple.
“You shouldn’t treat them here,” Steed told her. “No one wants to be headbutted every time they’ve got”—he gestured toward her side—“what is it you’ve got there?”
She held the small, ruddy fruit aloft. “Apple.”
The gelding reached his long muzzle up and took it from her hand.
“That was the last one,” Thea assured Steed.
“Good.” He nodded. After a moment, he asked, “Is everything well?”
She shrugged. “It isn’t exactly what I expected.” He must have thought she was homesick, that she’d come to the horses because she’d missed it and wished she hadn’t joined the guard. “I wouldn’t change it,” she added quickly. “Muck cleaning and all.” She hated the way she raised her chin in defiance.
“Muck cleaning?” He chuckled. “So you’ve been getting on well with your lead.”
Her posture, that challenge in her, immediately melted away. She’d deserved it, then. And Steed hadn’t known. “They don’t”—she cleared her throat to squash the emotion tightening it—“they don’t report to you?”
He shook his head. “Chevelle oversees all that.” Steed looked at her, his expression entirely solemn. “I’ve been asked to steer clear of the guard. Apparently, I’ve been a bit too approachable, and there’s some concern that my natural affability might bring about some problems.” He glanced over Thea’s shoulder at the darkened arches that led to the stables. “Wouldn’t do if I let slip someone breaking the rules.”
“I see,” Thea murmured. Steed had been reprimanded, and she’d put him in a spot. “And so”—she swallowed—“I should probably…”
Steed stared at her.
“…go?” she said.
Steed’s brow lowered in a warning.
She bit her lip, trying to hide a smile. “I promise,” she told him, but her words ran out, because the first rays of moonlight caught his eye, and she wasn’t sure exactly what she’d meant to say. She would stay out of trouble—that would have been a good promise but one she couldn’t keep. She would stay away from the horses—no, probably not. She would try. She could have said that. I promise to try.
She let out a breath that was nearly a laugh and ran past Steed to the wall. Her heart was alight with relief at narrowly escaping another rebuke, and she leapt to the top in a single bound. When her feet hit solid stone on the other side, she knew for certain that the castle was the only place she ever wanted to be.


Pre-order Now at  Amazon  Apple Books  Barnes & Noble  Google Play  Kobo



Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Exclusive First Look: The Frey Saga Shadow and Stone

Check out the exclusive first look at The Frey Saga Book V: Shadow and Stone below and enter to win a Fire tablet and Amazon gift card!

On Tour with Prism Book Tours

Shadow and Stone
(Frey Saga #5)
By Melissa Wright
New Adult, YA Fantasy
Paperback & ebook
February 4th 2020

No bargains unpaid.

After a perilous clash with the fey, the changeling who betrayed the paramount of their laws--and threatens the safety of both realms--has gone into hiding. As Frey and her Seven recover, concealed plans and furtive bargains begin to unravel, putting in danger their old guard and new.

They’re on unsteady ground.

Scattered and healing, those sworn to protect the North and its lord work to secure their footing. They are running out of time to cure the darkness poisoning the fey lands, before it overflows into the rest of the realm. But Ruby has gone missing, and this time it seems of her own accord.

They’re out of time.

If they don’t stop her, she’ll face the deadly changeling alone. But more forces are at play than it seems, and the fey lord confined on his lands by treachery and two half-human elves has made a bargain of his own.

(Affiliate link included.)

Excerpt

“Dark magic,” Aster said, “can make even the strongest seed no more than ash.”

Fire. She’d meant Francine’s fire, the burning of the villages. Questions flared in Thea’s mind, but she bit her tongue. This was clearly a sore subject for the girl, and there was no doubt where she placed the blame.

Thea followed silently as Aster brought them through an exquisite gateway. “This is our new garden,” Aster said, pride warring in her tone with what might have been loss. Or Thea might have been imagining things again.

“It is the loveliest I have ever seen,” Thea told her. She meant it. Not simply because she’d never seen a Council garden, but because the entire space before them was designed as a labyrinth of beautiful flora. Woven lattices stretched skyward, balanced with blooms. Carved archways loomed overhead, dripping with green moss that shaded ferns and delicate blossoms below. As they moved through the twisting pathways, pools came into view, watched over by shaped brush in the forms of everything from dragons to butterflies.

Thea had never seen so much variety in her life, let alone a single day. She stared, in awe of variations she’d not known possible. Red honeysuckle, freesia buds as big as her fist, leaves with white-tipped spikes, and thorns that dripped a black-violet slime. Her fingers drew in reflexively; Thea remembered the warnings she’d heard when she’d been young. The light elves did not just possess the capacity for beauty. They created poisons as well.

She glanced up from the splendor, and found Aster watching her, smile thin. Thea had a momentary image of Isa—the young halfling girl who was strong and wild enough to keep the humans at bay—and made a vow to remember something else.

Don’t underestimate anyone.

Other Books in the Series



About the Author

Melissa is the author of the Frey Saga, Descendants Series, and Shattered Realms. She is currently working on the next book, but when not writing can be spotted collecting the things she loves at Goodreads and Pinterest. Contact her through the web at www.melissa-wright.com


Tour Schedule
(Posts go live on the day they're scheduled.)

December 1st: Launch
December 2nd: Rebecca Belliston - Heart of Red, Blood of Blue
December 3rd: Morgan L. Busse - Flight of the Raven
December 4thJes Drew - Tales of Parallel Worlds
December 5th: Ronie Kendig - Brand of Light
December 6th: Alisha Klapheke - Fate of Dragons
December 7th: Jessica Leake - Through the White Wood
December 8th: Belle Malory - Electric Skies
December 9th: Melissa McShane - Burning Bright
December 10th: Jennifer Silverwood - Blackbriar Cove
December 11th: Melissa Wright - Shadow and Stone
December 12th: Grand Finale

Tour Giveaway


1 winner will receive an Amazon Fire Tablet and a $50 Amazon eGift Card
Open internationally (as long as winner is eligible to receive prizes)
Ends December 16, 2019

Sunday, December 1, 2019

12 Days of Fantasy Giveaway

It's time once again for the 12 Days of Fantasy for Christmas tour! Watch for an exclusive first look of The Frey Saga Book V: Shadow and Stone on December 11th and follow along to check out these amazing fantasy authors for a chance to win a Kindle Fire and Amazon gift card.
On Tour with Prism Book Tours

12 Days of Fantasy for Christmas

We're excited to be sharing books from ten fantasy authors with you this
holiday season! Each day different author and book or series will be featured.
There is also a fabulous giveaway! If you're a fantasy fan, join us on this tour!

Tour Schedule
(Posts go live on the day they're scheduled.)

December 1st: Launch
December 2nd: Rebecca Belliston - Heart of Red, Blood of Blue
December 3rd: Morgan L. Busse - Flight of the Raven
December 4thJes Drew - Tales of Parallel Worlds
December 5th: Ronie Kendig - Brand of Light
December 6th: Alisha Klapheke - Fate of Dragons
December 7th: Jessica Leake - Through the White Wood
December 8th: Belle Malory - Electric Skies
December 9th: Melissa McShane - Burning Bright
December 10th: Jennifer Silverwood - Blackbriar Cove
December 11th: Melissa Wright - Shadow and Stone
December 12th: Grand Finale